Your thoughts on FF books as AFF adventures

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BluesPixie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2016 3:20 pm

Your thoughts on FF books as AFF adventures

Post by BluesPixie » Tue Aug 23, 2016 10:29 am

Hi all,

This post is twofold; firstly I am interested in general advice and discussion on peoples thoughts and experiences using published FF books as the basis of full AFF games, and secondly, playing through a gamebook with AFF elements included.

regarding the second point:

As I mentioned in my introductory post, the vast majority of my sessions (at least until our baby daughter is old enough to either join in or afford me some free time!) will consist of 1on1 games with the wife. As I also mentioned, she is totally new to the idea of playing pen and paper RPGs, although she has a love of fantasy fiction and modern 'complex' boardgames and I'm sure she will enjoy the experience.

As a nice quick and easy introduction I had the idea of doing a GM'ed playthrough of a solo FF book, with myself basically reading the passages aloud to her and offering the choices, plus rolling for the NPC enemies. Due to the aforementioned baby time is at a premium and I figured this approach would allow us to get going with minimum delay. I haven't GM'ed a game since my A-level days (a hiatus of c.16 years) and hence this would also serve as a warm up for my hammy acting of voices and general delivery!

I have discussed the idea with her and she is game, I have of course explained that when we graduate to playing proper it will be a more fulfilling experience due to the greater sense of free will and space for ingenuity and improvisation. This restricted form of game will. however, act as a gentle introduction for her too (as unlike a multiplayer game, the onus will also be on her to make decisions, conduct dialogue, etc.).

Where I would appreciate the input of others lies in several points:

1. Which books would folk recommend as the best suited for this format (Ideally set in Allansia, but others considered if the argument is strong enough)?
2. Does anybody have any general tips for expanding the solo FF experience to accommodate an AFF character, such as employing skills etc.?
3. Thoughts on how best to handle the more "oops your dead, start again" aspect of the solo FF books. I really want to avoid the experience being either short-lived or frustrating for her (she'll never play again lol). I'm wondering whether I need to trawl through book making a note of all such potential passages, to enable some ad-libbing to circumvent them... problem here is that seems to add a lot of prep, something this was supposed to avoid. I definitely want character death to be a possibility, but not as a result of bad luck/single dice roll/unsignposted peril etc.

Thanks for reading.
BP

GreatArc
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2016 6:14 pm

Re: Your thoughts on FF books as AFF adventures

Post by GreatArc » Wed Aug 24, 2016 6:06 pm

I think you're putting too much effort into fitting the square peg in a round hole regarding the adventure.

Let's say you chose Firetop mountain to run, simply copy out, or post-it note elements you want to use and run the adventure this way:

1.) Print a mapped out version of FF1 online, there are a bazillion. (Here is 30 seconds of looking online: https://www.google.ca/search?q=warlock+ ... P29dWsM%3A)

2.) Write a page reference number beside each room so you can steal the description.

3.) Scan through the adventure and identify any potential bottlenecks or impassable points, and things that are required to actually advance or finish the adventure and think of a way which you could have them pop up again later in the dungeon if missed. (Can't remember well if it was a bow and arrow or a dragon scale shield or gargoyle jewel or whatever it was).

If a series of rooms was skipped over you can always improv a new room further ahead which will allow her to get the necessary item.

4.) Play it out.

5.) Name your child after me.

(My name is Gaylord Fartypants, I always wanted it to live on, but alas, I have no daughters of my own)

As far as FF modules I enjoyed that might translate well:

-Warlock of Firetop Mountain
-Talisman of Death
-Trial of Champions
-Demons of the Deep
-Island of the Lizard King

My vote is Warlock or Trial because they have defined boundaries which cut down on the wandering problems you would expect to deal with in a total sandbox style adventure. Linear works best to start.

Nuvole!
Archmage
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2013 6:06 pm

Re: Your thoughts on FF books as AFF adventures

Post by Nuvole! » Thu Aug 25, 2016 8:07 pm

1. Which books would folk recommend as the best suited for this format (Ideally set in Allansia, but others considered if the argument is strong enough)?
Well... there are official conversion of the full Sorcery Campaign and of The Warlock of Firetop Mountain... why not starting from there?
Then there is an amateur conversion of Deathtrap Dungeon that you can only run with the original FF gamebook in your hand: http://fightingfantasy.wikia.com/wiki/D ... adventure)
Said that, I'd start with a campaign of superclassics, that you probably know like the palm of your hand and therefore can manage more easily, like "Stonebridge cycle": Caverns of the Snow Witch - The Forest of Doom - Temple of Terror
Otherwise there are two stand-alone FF gamebooks that are structured extremely similarly to a free-roaming adventure: Island of the Undead and The Keep of the Lich Lord.

2. Does anybody have any general tips for expanding the solo FF experience to accommodate an AFF character, such as employing skills etc.?
Please have a look at the adventures already converted and mentioned above and you'll get quite quickly a fair idea.

3. Thoughts on how best to handle the more "oops your dead, start again" aspect of the solo FF books.
You can apply some STAMINA damage instead of an instant death, or you can use LUCK as a kind of "fate points" and deduct one point of LUCK for each instant death "avoided by a wisker".


My general comment is: relax and make a good faith attempt! You'll see that isn't too difficult at all, it's mostly a matter of practice. If you get stuck, just do your best and you'll see that next time, with more practice, it will be better.
He's a real Nowhere man, sitting in his Nowhere land, making all his Nowhere plans for Nobody.

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